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Load image into Gallery viewer, Dunlop SLS1404G Straplok Flush Mount Strap Retainer System, Gold
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Dunlop SLS1404G Straplok Flush Mount Strap Retainer System, Gold
Vendor
JIM DUNLOP

Dunlop SLS1404G Straplok Flush Mount Strap Retainer System, Gold

4.3
Regular price
£71.00
Sale price
£71.00
Regular price
£116.00
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Unit price
per 
Save 39% (£45.00)
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  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • Internal mounting for a sleeker profile
  • Two strap attachments are included
  • Available in four finishes

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Customer Reviews

The black ones in particular look really cool.I have Dunlop Straploks on literally every one of my 6 guitars. I started putting them on after a strap came off of its pin, causing my guitar to crash to the floor, and putting a crack in the neck heel.Originally I used the dual-purpose versions where you can unclick the lock and just use it as a normal strap pin. But I'd always thought looked a bit goofy, so I've started switching over to the flush mount.A word of warning- while the dual-purpose pins are a reversible modification, the flush mount pins are NOT. You really have to drill out the whole quite a bit to make them fit, and you won't be able to put a normal pin back in when you're done without plugging and redrilling the hole.As for the install: Installing the bridge-side pin is a snap. Just mark off the hole depth on a drill bit using some masking tape, the drill until the tape is in line with the hole. Insert pin, screw in, you're done. Everything is neat and flush.However, the neck-side pin presents some problems, especially on guitars with Strat-style upper horns. Manufacturers typically install the pin at the point where the horn is sharpest. Because of this, I have yet to get the flush mount to actually sit, well, flush. Typically there is a small gap on either side where it rounds away. I've had this happen on the two guitars I have with flush mounts.Just a fair warning.Also, I've been having issues with mine buzzing lately when I play a lower string. I'm still looking for a fix for that.That being said, I don't regret buying and installing these. The black ones in particular look really cool.5Recessed-flush and stronger because of it.Purchased a set of these for my daughter's electric, she had somehow stripped an existing knob out by having a loose screw. Instead of 'toothpicking' or filling the stripped hole, I purchased these and recessed them. Not only do they look great, the stap is secure, but a quick push of a button away to disconnect. Because they are recessed, the connection is stronger and has less external torque.If I ever have to replace a knob on one of my guitars, I'd consider the same system -- keeping in mind that it does require modification of the body... have to drill in to recess.5The Perfect StrapLockI like these so much better than standard straplocks. I've put them on all 5 of my basses now. They hold the strap closer to the instrument, so it's like the distance it would be when you slip a strap over normal pegs, rather than sticking out an inch like with normal straplocks. One downside is you've got to drill a 3/8" wide hole into your instrument, so if you're not willing to do that, take it to a luthier or these aren't for you.5Really like the way these look and workI have installed flush mount strap locks on all of my guitars , I bought two more sets to install on my new Schecter PT telecaster and my old Les Paul Custom. If you use a Forstner 3/8" drill bit to make the hole using the existing screw hole as a guide, a regular drill bit will give you tear out , so I highly recommend going this route, in my experience I had zero tear out and couldn't be happier.520+ years and going strongI have used the Dunlop Straploks ever since I bought a Tobias bass back in the 1990's, which came with the strap-button version. I first used the flush-mount version was when they came on a Warwick Streamer Stage I bass. I really liked the look, and I changed all my instruments over to the flush-mount version. I have replaced the strap portion of the Straplok on a few on the instruments, but I have yet to change the recessed piece on any instrument, some over 20 years old!I will agree with some comments I found that caution to take care when tightening the screws. The Phillips slot can easily strip if you do not use the proper pitched screwdriver, and once it is stripped it is quite a job getting the screw out of the instrument. I strongly recommend drilling a pilot hole at least as long as the mounting screw to make assembly easier, and be very careful to keep strong pressure on the screw if you are using a screw gun.These can be mounted with the 'lip' sitting outside the instrument or completely flush. In the first case, the depth of the recess hole is less critical as long as it is at least as deep as the fitment is long. If you are completely flush-mounting, drill a little at a time and use the fitment to check the depth. Having the fitment recessed past the edge of the instrument body does not allow the locks to engage properly. Also, remember to drill a hole that is as wide at the top lip, not the fitment body width, if you are completely flush mounting. Lastly, it is better to drill a slightly undersize hole rather than a slightly oversize hole. You can use a small hammer and flat piece of wood positioned on top of the fitment to tap the piece in for a very clean look. If you cannot start it with a strong push from your thumb the hole is too small and should be enlarged. I use a drill-bit gauge to drop the fitment through to determine the proper drill size in the first place because enlarging the hole just a little bit is not easy once an undersized hole is drilled. The fitments sometimes vary in diameter a few thousandths of an inch, so check each one before installation.Lastly, you may need to enlarge your strap's mounting hole to get the locks to fit. I use a cheap leather punch to 'nip' the hole evenly until the lock fits.This may seem like a lot of work, but I can say I have never dropped an instrument after I started using this product. I will always install them in every instrument I buy. I just hope they don't stop making them!5Great product, peace of mindEasy to install, if you have the tools. All you need is a couple of drill bits and a fairly skinny #2 Phillips screwdriver. Installation is quick, but be careful to protect the finish on your guitar. Choose the 3/8" drill bit that's going to give you the most control. If you already have strap buttons installed, some drill bits (Forstner, brad point) can walk around in the existing screw hole and damage the finish in an area that won't be covered by the relatively small flange on the barrel. Use a good quality screwdriver to install the screws, and don't neglect to lubricate the screws, even if you have existing screw holes. These screws will likely go deeper, and you're less likely to strip the screw heads if your screwdriver fits, properly. I ordered two sets of these straplocks, and one set did not come with the required "e-clips". It's likely that they were robbed for another package that was missing the clips. I'll work something out, but be sure all the parts are there before starting the install.5Took some extra work but worth itPROS* various finish options* priced in the range of other strap locks* flushmount is a nice option if your guitar can accomodateCONS* not easily reversible due to needing to drill a larger hole for the flush mount insert* requires drilling about 1/4" deeper than a standard schaller straplock* maintenance is recommended in the instructions -- cleaning with wd-40 to avoid jamming/sticking* may have difficulty using certain higher quality/thicker leather straps* error in instructions calls for drilling with a 0.400 drill bit (good luck finding one). They actually mean that you should drill with a 3/8 bit, to a depth of .400 - measured the part with calipers before I installed.DETAILSI usually use Fender/Schaller style straplocks on my guitars and have never had an issue with those, other than the nut that holds the top half to the strap can come loose - but when it does it is typically obvious before you would ever have an issue. You tighten it with a socket on one side, and an adjustable wrench holding the other side -- and it will stay tight for a long, long time. The only problem -- on an SG the strap lock is on the back, facing your stomach, and the Schallers stick out about 3/4 of an inch, and poke you in the stomach. (Or possibly worse if you like to hang your guitar more at groin height. Can I get a snare hit?) Dual design Dunlops also stick out too far, really, on the SG. I tried those first but finally came back to the Flush Mounts, and in the end I'm very glad I did. However...I'm confident that both Schaller and Dunlop make good products that work well when properly installed. But the countersunk Dunlops are a little tricky on an SG. Mine is a '61 SG reissue, for reference. Compared to a "normal" straplock - Schaller or dual purpose Dunlop -, the screws will go about 1/4" deeper. (The actual screw length is similar but they are mounted deeper due to being in the bottom of the flush mount insert.) See photo of 2 screws and consider what is flush with the guitar body and that will make sense to you.The flush mount Dunlop *seemed* genius and like it was the perfect solution. Unfortunately, the screws are so long that they will go slightly through the front of the guitar, although in a location that is covered by a plastic cover. I read on a website that on an SG you will actually hit the truss rod, but mine didn't - I was extremely careful to drill with a tiny pilot drill first, and "feel for it", gradually expanding until I had the right hole.I removed the front plate, felt for the pilot drill, finally put the screw in once I determined that it was no big deal, and filed the tip of the screw so it would be flush with the face of the guitar, then replaced the plastic cover that hides it.If you use a thick leather strap like a Levy's leather strap, you may have difficulty getting these on the strap. I have several Levys straps, and on one there was no way these would ever work. On the others, I was able to actually get it to fit ok.On the bottom edge of the guitar after drilling the 3/8" hole, I discovered Gibson had a 15/64" hole inside with a plastic anchor for the original strap button -- too big for the screw to fasten into obviously. So I had to drill that out further to 1/4", glue in a hardwood dowel, drill a pilot hole in that, and then mount the new assembly.It has worked out fabulously well, but this was more work than any other straplocks I've installed. On my SG, the other style locks sticking out was a real pain, and this is much better -- I'm glad I did it but it took a bit of extra work.UPDATE: I gigged with this as my main guitar for more than a year since these were installed. Still very happy with them - no issues. They also never come loose (unlike my schallers), never need tightening, and that goes for the "guitar-side" part and the "strap-side" part. In fact I bought another SG today (you know...GAS), and I'm about to order another set of these and install them on that guitar too!5Better option than dual designI committed to Dunlop Straploks years ago. As a gigging musician I need to have some kind of straplocks on my guitars. I've seen and heard too many horror stories about dropped (or flung!) guitars.I used to use the Dual Design straploks, which are nice if you want to be able to use a regular strap on that guitar. However, I realized that all of my guitars and straps have the straplok system, so I don't need that option. Also, when locked in the dual design buttons bring the strap out quite a bit from the body of the guitar, which has a couple of issues:1. It can change the balance of the guitar, or be bulky. Especially with strap buttons that are behind the neck.2. It looks kind of bad, like your strap is "floating" out there on a weird post.These are your solution. They come with mounting instructions and they bring the strap to where it would normally be on a standard strap button. Looks great and very clean when the strap is off too. Balance isn't an issue anymore and replacing a neck strap button with one of these makes it much more comfortable. Unless you are replacing a previous set, you WILL have to drill out a hole to install. Follow the instructions and you'll do fine.Depending on the thickness of your strap, is how much pain you are in for when installing the locking button. It can take thin straps no problem, but I have had some issues with thicker leather straps, especially if they are new and not flexible yet. I just take a drill bit and drill the button hole on the strap out a touch and it usually makes it much easier to install. Once they are on, they are not easily coming off.BE AWARE: Lubricate your lock button about once a year or so. (The part that goes on the strap) I put a silicone spray lube in there, so the pin and locking balls move smoothly. I have never had this issue, but some people report that it can get stuck in the "unlocked" position if dry over time which can cause your guitar to fall.5Streamlined Looks; Dunlop LocksI've used Dunlops on pretty much every guitar and bass I've had. These are great for having the locking feature, but more streamlined in that the strap is closer to the guitar body; perfect for people who feel Dunlop's Dual Design or Original locks stick out too far. Fodera has been using these for decades as did Warwick in the 90's. Definitely a great looking take on the Dunlop design.5The guitar feels more "snug"I'm not sure when these strap locks first hit the market, but the great Ritchie Blackmore is the first I know of to sink a set of Dunlop strap locks into the body of his guitars. It's something I discovered while constructing a strat like Blackmore's to play in a Deep Purple tribute band. The guitar feels much more "snug" as a result... and it is.These strap locks place the weight of the guitar firmly inside the body. You don't have the leverage created by a half-inch peg sticking out, which puts a lot of stress on the screw. The barrel sunk into the body with the screw anchoring another inch deep (with a dab of wood glue) makes it virtually impossible to strip out even during vigorous performances.Blackmore was known in his younger days to toss the guitar around quite a bit, and had to be sure the strap locks wouldn't strip out. These worked out pretty well for him.5
Dunlop SLS1404G Straplok Flush Mount Strap Retainer System, Gold

Dunlop SLS1404G Straplok Flush Mount Strap Retainer System, Gold

4.3
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
£71.00
Sale price
£71.00
Regular price
£116.00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (£45.00)