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Pierce Brown

Red Rising

Pierce Brown

Red Rising

£42.00 £26.00 Save: (38.1%)
£26.00 £42 Save £16 (38.1%)
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Product Description Product Description
  • NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY, BUZZFEED, AND SHELF AWARENESS
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Customer Reviews

A hyped up book that I found to be pretty average.2 3/4 Stars for me.I figured it was time to read this one, since I've seen so much hype surrounding it. And now that I'm done, eh, I think maybe the hype was a bit much. Don't get me wrong, the writing is great, but the story itself bored me about half the time.I really, really enjoyed the beginning -- the genre-bending style hooked me, especially the cyberpunk elements. But shortly after all the aspects I liked disappeared and it began to be somewhat of a chore.The style reminded me of Ted Dekker's Circle series (though it has been many years since I read that) -- it's an easy read with a fairly quick pace.I also found myself not even caring for the protagonist after the beginning. After he's "carved" into something new, something great, he seems to become cocky. He constantly tells himself how much better he is than everyone else, bigger, stronger, faster.Well, I know I'm in the minority on this one, but it just didn't tick all the boxes for me. *shrugs3Slayed meConfession: When this first came out, I actually shunned it just because of all the buzz and hype because I am such a contrarian. The masses couldn't possibly be right, can they? Yes, I was acting a little bit of a Gold. Plus the description just sounded like every other would be Hunger Games dystopian novel out there - derivative and ... a society stratified by colors, really?And yet one day, four days ago to be exact, a copy happened to fall into my lap and upon reading the first page I was instantly, irrevocably HOOKED. I write this now having ripped through the entire trilogy in THREE DAYS.Did I surreptitiously read it on my phone at work? YES. Did I battle exhaustion trying to read one more chapter into the late, late night despite loving sleep almost as much as chocolate? YES. Did I pounce on every vaguely bookish person I know and blather with the crazed look and incoherence of a fanatic about this novel, despite not even being a sci-fi reader? YES.Don't be put off by the proliferation of all caps in my review. I haven't been this excited about a book in such a long time, plus I was in a bit of a reading slump, having been adrift in a sea of discarded books. So you must forgive me.Okay, I will concede that the comparisons to Hunger Games and the Lord of the Flies have merit. Not only that, there are heavy Greek and Roman allusions. There are recognizable, familiar elements. This is after all a classic Hero's Journey. The lowly Darrow, motivated by grief and revenge manages to rise to the highest strata - to even the realm of the gods.It is not original and yet it is. Like Sevro and the Howlers and the rest of the House of Mars, I want to follow Darrow and see what next audacious step he takes. I was constantly surprised, on the edge of my seat trying to see how he would win or recover from a failure.I'll admit there are problems. The female characters do not seem fully realized. There's a helluva lot of rape going on. But even with its flaws, Red Rising slayed me. I was all in from the first line to the last. I got the next book after a hundred pages in.One thing I am thankful for, having come into this series rather late is that I had the entire trilogy at my disposal, reading one right after the other, without that agonizing long wait in between.So far, Red Rising is probably #6 (out of 35) in my top reads of 2017.5Would Not RecommendLet me start by acknowledging that I'm probably not the target audience for this book. I feel like it aims fairly strictly for young boys in the way that Twilight aims for young girls. If you did enjoy this book and you don't fit the target audience that's fine too, but for me it was just a waste of time."Red Rising" struck me overly lofty, sanctimonious, and obsessively violent. The main character seemed to just kind of morph into whatever he needed to be for the plot to continue without a real feeling of growth. Phrases like "I screamed like a rage god" made me cringe. Everything before all of the teenagers were thrown into their death camp felt like a preamble, with occasional interesting world building elements thrown in. There were definitely times where it felt like the book was relishing in the deaths of characters, trying a little too hard to make the reader feel loss for someone we didn't have enough time to get attached to.Overall, not the book for me.1Perfectly thought provoking.At times, science fiction terrifies me. An author who writes a story set in the future of our reality has the delightful experience of wondering what humans will be like far into the future. Ones who think about it scientifically get to think about our future evolved selves: what will be selected, how we will look, how we will act, etc. The authors who are optimistic about the human race and its future bore me. Optimism has got to be the dumbest thing people push at one another. No, no. The ones who assume the worst of humanity and/or its evolved form... those are the ones worth reading in my opinion as my faith in humanity and its future waned long ago. This book does just that.Humanity historically has been immoral time and time again. It has made the same mistakes time and time again. Its people in power have been the figurehead of that immorality as they lead those who follow into darkness. As they thirst for power and prestige. Red Rising is a story of mankind making its usual mistakes with a futuristic twist. Of a slave daring to be more, daring to be perhaps a master of masters, only to then set free his people, the low colors. This is the first book of 3 in this trilogy, you can read the first and be happy but if you pick up the second be ready to immediately buy the 3rd.The story felt jumpy at times as if the author accidentally edited some stuff out which was disappointing but the story is a perfect 5 stars. Writing brought it down to 4.4Recommended. First book is the strongestSeries: 4 starsSeries general review: Recommended. First book is the strongest, a more gut wrenching, better written version of the Hunger Games. Books 2-3 are OK. The sequels are dragged down by: 1) Time lapse/gap between books. 2) Poor characterization.Book 1: 5, Book 2: 4, Book 3: 3Book 1: 5 StarsOverview: Red Rising follows Darrow. A young slave born into a mine working family. After suffering loss and hardship he must make a choice: continue on as before? end his life? or strike back at the oppressors? What follows is basically GATTICA and The Hunger Games. On Steroids.+ Overarching themes. A back and forth look at the human spirit, what drives people, and what people are willing to overcome.+ Awesome world. The author does a great job building a plausible universe. It is detailed and interesting. While certain sci-fi elements don't pass the logic test, it is an enjoyable universe.+ Does a good job with keeping the protagonist 'human'. No infallible/invincible characters here.+ An exciting read. Hard to put down+/- Most stories pull you into following a person, this story pulled me into following a movement, an idea of change. I did not particularly like Darrow, but that didn't take away from the story.+/- Bloody. Themes include slavery/rape/torture/cannibalism.- Written POV. Best described as First Person masquerading as Third Person Limited. We are basically watching a story unfold with limited information into Darrow's mind... but the story is filled with: 'I did...'.- Relatively poor characterization. Most characters are stereotypical with limited growth. The characters that do show changes are recycled: as the series goes on, the same 'growth' is applied to 3-4 other characters.5this was a good book. I meanDamn, this was a good book.I mean, to be honest, the first 30% was a bit of a struggle. It was an important 30% though, as this was the long and meaningful setup to the amazing 70%, and I'm glad I stuck it out.At first I struggled with the writing style, as Brown is adept at the current trend of writing in a plain, straight forward manner, while I'm a bit of a relic that enjoys fancy prose. Also, I didn't really connect or care much for the MC, when he only decided to give a shit out of revenge. Also, the whole premise of the series being essentially class warfare just doesn't catch me much. Never has.Yet, still, with all that counted against Brown, damn did he tell a bloodydamn good story.As I said, about 30% into this book, we cut past the flesh and fluff, and hit true meat and bones, and it's a wild, mad rush with many twists and turns that I just couldn't predict. I couldn't put this thing down by about halfway through, and I swear to Athena I'm eager to hop onto book #2.5Deserves all the hypeI'm rather late this to this series. I've seen the hype, and always have been tempted but never had the time to pick it up. But since I recently purchased the paperback on a whim, and after experiencing a small book slump it was finally the time to crack it open.And WOW!!!! This is one of the books that deserves all the hype.The beginning of the book was slow, but around 20% I was HOOKED!!! Not surprising that I'm totally and utterly consumed. Since reading Harry Potter I love anything related to academies, school and institutions that make the characters go through tests and trials. That was also one of the reasons why I absolutely adored Enders Game. Color me shocked when I read how Red Rising was marketed:Pierce Brown s relentlessly entertaining debut channels the excitement of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins and Ender s Game by Orson Scott Card.Admittedly, right there I should have known that I would love it. The Hunger Games, especially the first book was my most favorite of all, and seeing it being mentioned next to Ender's Game just confirmed my feelings - I'm in for an epic rollercoaster ride.Also, I should mention that whenever I get so involved that I start researching characters on wikia, in this case red-rising.wikia.com, I'm beyond help. I went down the rabbit hole willingly and I don't regret anything - lol.Now, to the novel.From 20% on until the very end I couldn't put the book down. The characters were intriguing, colorful, and fascinating. Darrow, a flawed and far from perfect character, that manages to be victorious but also still emphatic enough that set backs deeply hurt him, carried this story with outstanding dexterity. His struggles, development and growth were palpable and traceable. And most of all his journey wasn't without failures - which made this book even more intriguing.The social hierarchy of this epic series was complex, and the world building as original and fascinating as expected from such a hyped series. The twists and turns in Red Rising already took my breath away. Just a small warning, the author takes no care with his characters, very similar to George R.R. Martin sacrificing characters for the greater good of the arc is something these authors have in common. And maybe that's a sign why both series have become such worshipped sagas.Nevertheless I'm already on book 2 and will be finishing book three sometime this week. Afterwards I'll be waiting to start the second trilogy starting with book 4 closer to the release date of book 5 in February.In fact I can't wait to see where this series is taking me.Notably, Darrow's mission is as epic as it seems to be impossible. With this in mind I just hope it all has a positive and hopeful outcome. Let's cross fingers and hope for the best, because I'm on this train until it stops, hopefully without massive casualties.4Can't believe I paid money to read this.The book is derivative, tediously written, pandering. It is written from a point of view of an irritating 16 year old boy for irritating 14 year old boys and reads like it came out in 1954, not 2014.1Ender's Game and Hunger Games mixGreat story and others have said it's like a mix between Ender's Game and Hunger Games. They're right. You get a super smart/gifted guy from the lowest of low socioeconomic people group infiltrate the highest group and dominate them with better strategy and tactics in war games that often end in death. I enjoyed the writing and Brown did a pretty good job creating a futuristic culture and world on Mars.I didn't give it 5 stars because I wished we would have gotten to know some of the other characters a little more. Darrow kept changing scenarios and circumstances so much you never really get connected to anyone else. Also much of the book takes place in his head rather than in dialogue with other people. That also limits your ability to get to know them more. It was also a little unbelievable Darrow was suddenly able to beat everyone he comes across just because he's fast with his new body. I get that he's smart, but he can't learn how to fight just by getting a new body. The entirely new body was the last thing that irked me. Darrow really was physically unable to do anything as a Red against the Golds. It's not really an underdog story. He still had to become a Gold (and a physically superior one at that) to win.All in all I really enjoyed it. I do tend to focus on the negative sometimes so keep that in mind with my review. I definitely plan on seeing where the story goes in book 2.4who through genetic and surgical manipulation have evolved as superior human beingsRed Rising is the first book of the Red Rising Trilogy. It is a science fiction story about a dystopian society set on a terraformed Mars.Society in Red Rising is a caste system (based upon birth), where the inhabitants fall into a hierarchy of 14 colors representing their ranking within society. At the top of the hierarchy are the Golds, who through genetic and surgical manipulation have evolved as superior human beings. At the bottom of the hierarchy are the Reds, who are unskilled manual laborers, conditioned to a brutal environment. The remainder of society falls into one of the other colors that fill a specific need within society.Red Rising focuses on the Golds and Reds: the Golds rule society with an iron fist and no compassion; the Reds toil all day in their underground city where they remain miners from generation to generation. These Reds have no actual knowledge of the rest of society; they have been deceived into believing that by mining helium-3 they are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations. In reality, Mars and the rest of the solar system had been successfully colonized centuries earlier. The Golds control not only what and where the Reds live and work, but what they know. Our hero, Darrow, is a Red. He and the Reds like him are essentially slaves to a decadent ruling class, enslaved for generation after generation with no voice and no hope.But there are those who have learned the truth and want change. The story takes shape as Darrow is rescued by a group of rebels known as The Sons of Ares; Darrow has been selected to infiltrate the Golds at its highest levels.The book is fast paced and exciting, although it takes roughly two thirds of the book to establish the backstory. This is both a positive and a negative: it takes a long time to get to the exciting part, but one of the things I liked about this book is the in-depth character development and backstory. I gave this book a rating of four out of five due to the excellent character development and backstory, and the quick pace once it reached its stride.4
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