Items in bag

WOW0821240209BLCLJLLLML

  • Free shippingOn all prepaid orders

  • 10 dayreturns

  • COD available all for Orders Under Rs. 3000

  • India's largest selectionof Beauty Products

  • Star Trek Generations
  • Star Trek Generations

GNP Crescendo Records

Star Trek Generations

GNP Crescendo Records

Star Trek Generations

£84.00 £51.00 Save: (39.29%)
£51.00 £84 Save £33 (39.29%)
Delivery Time: 12-18 days

Quantity:

  • 1
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
Delivery Time: 12-18 days

Import Duties to be borne by the customer at the time of delivery.
Product price is exclusive of such duties.

4 Great Reasons To Buy From Us:

  • Tracked Shipping on all orders

  • 100% Original
    Products

  • Secure Payments

  • 14 Days Returns

  • Tracked Shipping on all orders

  • 100% Original
    Products

  • Secure Payments

  • 10 Days Returns

Product Description Product Description
Expanded Collector edition of the epic soundtrack.
Read More
Read Less
Reviews See all reviews

Customer Reviews

Your nerd is showingThere are some beautiful tracks to behold here and a striking theme in "Overture." People make fun of me if they see this CD lying around, but if they hear it without knowing what it is, they express their admiration for it. The ethereal Christmas Hug is nearly elegiac. While Dennis McCarthy's efforts are still rooted in television and overshadowed in Trek canon by the mighty gods that are Jerry Goldsmith and James Horner, this is still a very enjoyable CD. And go ahead, blast the sound effects tracks! This 2CD release has the expanded score along with the original soundtrack release. Brent Spiner's 17 second ditty "Lifeforms" provides a humorous note to end on.4Sneaky GoodAnyone who isn't familiar with the music of Star Trek is recommended to check out some of the more famous Goldsmith and Horner scores (most of which have recent expanded releases). They're the big names, and rightfully so. Generations isn't quite as cinematic, as influential, or as good as those albums.But it's sneaky good.Trek fans know that the movie Generations was made in a serious hurry after the end of the series. It is a mixed bag; some profound ideas and great visuals, but ultimately a disappointment that needed another rewrite and a better death scene for Captain James Tiberius Kirk. The score, however, is better than the movie. It's the only Trek movie to be scored by Dennis McCarthy, who did many, many episodes of the Next Generation and its descendant shows. Since he's used to TV scheduling, it seems like the score, instead of feeling rushed like the rest of the movie, is well realized. And it does sound less like a movie score and more like a TV score, but one that goes beyond the limits of TV. The typical moody string passages that fans have heard over and over again are definitely present, and some equally characteristic trumpet and brass solos. The original Alexander Courage theme punctuates several cues. But beyond that is a haunting and beautiful choral element, almost unheard of in Trek (undiscovered country, if you will), some more vigorously punctuated action music than you get on the TV show, and a cohesiveness and shape to the score that isn't found in McCarthy's often recycled TV cues. The end result is an emotionally affecting journey that goes from menace, sadness, and dread to peace and love and the humanism that Star Trek is known for. It's a good listen. And definitely a better buy than the television scores would be; this is McCarthy's best single work, both readily identifiable to fans but distinctive and different.As to whether the two-disc collector's edition is worth it, I think it is. Compared to the original release (~45 minutes), the expanded one clocks in at 1.2 hours, and includes the original soundtrack and a couple of bonus cues. Much of the new material is interstitial mood music, but that's McCarthy's strength, and in addition, several significant musical moments from the film reappear that were omitted from the original release: the awkwardness of Kirk taking command at the beginning of the movie is an interesting off-key trumpet solo, the Enterprise's first Klingon encounter is an energetic piece driven by metallic percussion, and the one I really missed was the transition from Kirk's death (the first one, when he isn't actually dead) into the movie's noble theme and the Next Generation crew. There are also a few bonus tracks on the second disc, including an isolated version of the beautiful choral theme for eternal paradise (the Nexus) and a quick rendition of Data's ditty of scanning for life forms (a pretty amusing meta moment for fans where they're basically poking fun at the rote aspects of the genre).Having listened to both, the expanded release duplicates the experience of the movie itself and is definitely better; if you're going to get this album at all you might as well do it right. The expanded version has some decent liner notes, but no really special glamour packaging or anything like that. Then again, it's not crazy expensive either.As other reviewers have noted, the new AutoRip feature only gives you the original one-disc album. I don't really care myself as long as the CD is right, but it's something to consider if you do care.The bottom line is that this is a good buy for Trek fans, and worth considering for anyone else who likes orchestral film and TV music.4Been waiting since 1994 for this!I already had the original soundtrack to Generations from 1994, but there were many tracks from the movie that were missing in it. I found this item online recently, and it has ALL of the film's music. I mainly bought it for tracks 13 and 16, but overall I'm impressed with this album. I wish that Dennis McCarthy had released all of the music originally though instead of making fans of the movie wait nearly two decades to complete it! :D5I bought this as a replacementI had owned the cassette version of this soundtrack and I loved it, so when it finally gave up I had to switch to CD. The music is just beautiful and so epic. I never understood why so many Star Trek Fans did not like the music that accompanied this movie, but I loved the stirring music and vocals on this CD. It gives a grandness that Star Trek is known for, as well as a subtle emotional side not matched since the Inner Light where Picard plays the flute with such emotion. I highly recommend this CD! There is not one track I disliked. - I could have done without the sound effects forcing you to go through each track, but they were great to have as well.5Some of my favorite Trek cuesThough this score contains some of my favorite cues, and is very well-done, I've noticed that for some reason the score is funner to listen to while you're watching the film, or at least for me. It's a good score, and I listen to it occasionally, but I think McCarthy's strong-suit was creating a soundtrack fit for a film, more than for a separate release.4Incredible MusicI searched for a long time for a CD with the whole complete album music. It even had the HMS Enterprise theme, it has a lot of the sweeping moving music. It sits in my CD holder.5Good Star Trek MusicDennis McCarthy composed and conducted music for 1994's Star Trek Generations. McCarthy wrote music for episodes of Star Trek The Next Generation(1987-1994). McCarthy's music for the film is underrated. It was criticized at the time for sounding like "TV music". He wrote some good music as the Klingon sisters Lursa and B'Etor mercilessly attack the USS Enterprise D. There's a good music cue as people try to get to safety on the saucer half of the Enterprise. The next three Star Trek movies had music composed by Jerry Goldsmith. McCarthy wrote music for MacGyver and the McHale's Navy movie in 1997. This is underrated music from an underrated Star Trek movie.4LifeformsThere are two discs. The first one has the film score and the second one has the album, extras and sound effects. The sound effects is especially special I think for a soundtrack. It would be good if they did that for other scores. The inclusion of a little dialogue is also special. There's a very brief one from Data. It's too bad they don't have more dialogue on soundtracks too.5Not one of the best movies, but still good.Excellent music. And its Star Trek. 5Music Nexus Now Completely Open(This review (sent 11-19-12) is for the new (Nov 2012) complete score 2CD re-release)Another Trek movie gets the complete score treatment, which leaves only "Insurrection" (#9) and "Nemesis" (#10) left now. (And any new/future Trek movies)As with earlier expanded Trek soundtracks, the first disk is the "complete" score, and disk 2 is a re-release of the original soundtrack album. (Complete with sound effects tracks)And, as with "First Contact" 's expanded re-release earlier this year, the booklet has a general discussion of the score, ending with an invitation to go to GNP Crescendo's "Generations" soundtrack site to get the actual track-by-track score analysis. The company acts a lot like the Nexus that way -- you have to really work to get what you want to come to you.The score to this film is like a score to a TNG episode writ larger. (Ironically enough, some later DS9 episodes re-used portions of this score).Lots of average stuff here, with ok action cues and the usual TNG schtick. Also, since the film deals with time, mortality, life, death, reality, fantasy, and other "Big Themes"(TM), "Generations" is probably the most emotional score since "ST3: Search for Spock." "Gen.s" has the quietest and most subdued and mysterious opening title of any Trek movie, and the rollicking title theme isn't really revealed til the end credits. The Nexus theme and the aftermath of the Enterprise crash are well scored, and Kirk gets a decent musical sendoff before the well-scored (and very well-dialogued) final scenes.With over 30 extra minutes of score, this soundtrack is essentially complete.Most of the "extra" score is from the first half of the movie -- a variety of standard mood- and plot-establishing cues. They are:--Kirk's wistful early glances at the captain's chair and the new captain's first uncertain reactions to the looming crisis (Disc 1: Tracks 2, 4)--(Here I'm guessing, but I guess if Disc 1 Track 5 has any new material, it's the transition to the Next Generation/ HMS Enterprise at the end)--Tracks 6 & 7 explores Picard's feelings getting some bad news, dark mystery chords for the investigation of an attack on the Amargosa Observatory, and Data contemplating giving his emotion chip another try--Tracks 9-13 Data Malfunctions; Geordi's Kidnapping (typical action cue with elements that get recycled in this score a lot); Guinan and the Nexus; Torture ("Gen" 's most infamous deleted scene); and "Soran's Plan Revealed," the wonderfully spacy underscore to the scene in the spectacular Stellar Cartography setThe track called "Prisoner Exchange" is a real oddity, occurring three separate times in this 2-CD set (D1, Tk14; D2, Tk6 and Tk 39). Track 39 is one of the "bonus tracks," calling itself the "film version." (If this is so, why not save space and just put it on the first CD in place of Tk14, which is just a straight repeat of the 2nd disc's 6th track?) Even then, the only noticeable difference is in the first moments, which have the slightly march-like bass hits removed from the album version in favor of subdued sustained notes for the film version.The original album's "Nexus / Christmas Hug" track (CD2: Tk 10) is separated into 2 tracks on the first CD (Tk.s 18 & 19), affecting the presentation of musical transition between scenes. Also, CD1's Track 19 ("A Christmas Hug / Kitchen Debate") seems to randomly skip over portion's of Picard's meeting with Nexus-Guinan, straight into the first cues in the earliest Picard and Kirk scenes. At least, I didn't catch the wonderful and noble super-low brass notes for Guinan's appearance that are definitely still on the original album's "Christmas" track.Track 16 ("The Gap / Coolant Leak / App't with Eternity / Out of Control / Blasted / The Crash")is an expanded version of the original album's "Out of Control / The Crash" track (8), with all of the extra plot points' music cues added on and slotted in. IE, the first album had the underscore to scenes D and F, and this new cue includes scenes A through F of this particular sequence, occurring right after the Klingon attack, as Picard finds a way through Soran's shields, and the Enterprise-D goes through its wild death throes.And track 21 tacks on the "Crash Recap," thus completing the score.The other two Bonus Tracks are a section of "The Christmas Hug" in a choir-only version, and Data's peculiar little "Life-Forms" ditty.... Cute.And there you have it: all of the extra cues, and the few tiny discrepancies that this expanded soundtrack has. I'd recommend this only if you really REALLY Love this score as one of your top five all-time favorites. Since this is neither the greatest nor the worst Trek movie score, you are very likely just as well off keeping or getting (for a steal-level price) the original album, which already has pretty much all of the important cues (and those fun sound effects).3
See All Reviews
Delivery Delivery
  • Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched.
  • The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing.
  • In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.
Returns Return
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 14 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@ninetribe.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened, any tags are removed or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • NineTribe reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.

Recently Viewed

Back to Top