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  • The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics

Penguin Books

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics

Penguin Books

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics

£48.00 £29.00 Save: (39.58%)
£29.00 £48 Save £19 (39.58%)
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Customer Reviews

Extraordinary BookI rarely read this type of book. Often times, I just want to be entertained so I reach for books in the genre of fantasy or science fiction. Yesterday my search was for a reviewed tried and true good book. This one had over 20,000 reviews with such high ratings and praise. It just couldn't be bad. This book was so outstandingly great that I couldn't put it down and know it will be re-read often. I never knew human beings could be like Joe, the main character. His early years were so awful but Joe never wasted time on self pity. His energy was spent on surviving to become a self resilient, confident, strong, caring, problem solver. Honestly my words can't truly describe him. The story was wonderfully told. Learning about the Washington program and team....their struggles and feats to make it to gold were so awe inspiring. I will be thinking about this book for along time to come. Thank you for such a treasure.5You don't have to like rowing to love this book! A page-turner!The prospect of reading a nonfiction book, particularly one based on history, appeals to me about as much as, say, taking the SAT again. Given the choice, I'll pick fiction every time. In addition, I have little interest in reading about sports or rowing. But reader recommendations and critics' reviews carry great weight with me, and "The Boys in the Boat" has some of the highest ratings I've ever seen, so I took a deep breath, and decided to read this book that I had originally intended as a gift. And wow, am I glad I did! This is one of the best books I've ever read.Daniel James Brown has beautifully crafted a nonfiction book with all the elements that make a great novel: gripping plot, unforgettable characters, dramatic conflict, and heart-pounding suspense. Injecting suspense into a story where the outcome is known is quite a trick, but Brown accomplishes it superlatively.We meet the nine boys as college freshmen at the University of Washington in 1933. In the middle of the Great Depression, most of them are valiantly trying to stay afloat financially in order to stay in school. None had ever rowed anything larger than a rowboat; the main incentive in trying out for crew was the possibility of a part-time campus job if they made the team - no athletic scholarships here. The story follows one boy in particular, Joe Rantz, whose childhood deprivations rival those of Oliver Twist and who had to resort to some enterprising artful dodging of his own just to stay alive. The nine boys, their brilliant but frustrated coach Al Ulbrickson, and their team guru, renowned boat builder George Pocock, overcome obstacle after obstacle in their quest to represent the U.S. and win gold in the 1936 Berlin Olympics. As the best storytellers do, the author kept me continually on the edge of my seat; just as soon as one incredibly hard challenge- miserable training weather, economic hardships, wily opponents, devious Nazis - is surmounted, another even more daunting one is thrown in their path.Seamlessly juxtaposed with the crew cliffhanger is the story of Hitler's engineering of the 1936 Olympics as a showcase for Nazi Germany, removing all traces of anti-Semitism and presenting Berlin as squeaky-clean and as wholesome as Disneyland.Many light moments are interspersed with the strife and drama. My favorite is an incredible adventure the boys had when they took the coach's launch out onto the Hudson River on an evening before the national championship Poughkeepsie Regatta. I won't spoil it for you here, but what happened to them then could never happen now; it's one of the many unforgettable anecdotes in this book.In fact, many of the elements in this story are incredible. If this had been a work of fiction, I might have found fault with the author for exaggerating at times in order to emphasize a plot point. But in fact, Daniel James Brown did meticulous and exhaustive research, and the events portrayed here are no author's fabrication - it all really happened! Brown's skill in relating this true story to make it seem as if you're reading an enthralling novel, is what elevates "The Boys in the Boat" to the extraordinary level. Don't miss this remarkable, inspiring book!5but the account reads like a page turning novelDaniel Brown s the Boys in the Boat is the story of the underdog. It is the accomplishment of individuals, a team of working class beginners, and a country immersed in economic upheaval. Brown writes a true story of the University of Washington rowing team, improbable winner of the 1936 Olympic medal in Berlin. He approaches the task as journalist and historian, but the account reads like a page turning novel. He examines the 1936 setting, both in Germany, and in the United States. He researches Hitler s world and the rise of Nazi power in Europe. He shows how Hitler and his aides manipulated the Berlin Olympics as propaganda to demonstrate to the world Germans are a superior race. Even though the reader understands how that bad story ends, Brown, through use of plotting, builds suspense and interest, making that history a compelling read. Brown describes the setting in the USA: The aftermath of The Great Depression. He makes the pain come alive through the sad story of Joe Rantz. When only a young child his mother died leaving a desperate father unable to care for Joe. When the father remarried, unable to stand up to his new wife, he deserts his son. Only a child Joe must learn to completely care for himself. His story is one of hurt, survival and victory. Brown then educates the reader about rowing competition. He discusses Britain s predominance in the sport, where rowers came from the upper class. He then takes the sport to America where the upper class continued to dominate east coast rowing. And finally, Brown brings his skill to showing the reader the rag tail crew from the University of Washington who came from working class and farm backgrounds and didn t even have matching uniforms. Brown interviews Joe Rantz as an old man, who was a member of the team. After Joe died Brown interviews Joe s daughter Judy Willman who connected him with other members of the team, and their descendants. Using interviews and journals from the crew Brown shows the psychological growth the rowers needed to achieve to let go of ego, submerge self, and become a team. He reveals the love and support they gave each other which lasted well into their old age. The experience gave each energy and confidence to succeed in other areas of life. The book is based on historical research well done. But the author does much more with the story than that. He is a writer with knowledge of presenting setting, character, and plotting skill. He brings history to life with empathy and insight.4The final race is worth the price of admissionThe Boys in the Boat is an exceptional book. It tells the story of the nine young men who competed for gold in the 1936 Berlin Olympics.Even though the book title refers to "the boys", it really is the story about just one of those boys in particular, Joe Rantz. The book follows Joe's story from a young boy all the way through the Olympics, and along the way we meet an excellent cast of characters - his eight compatriots, family members, coaches, and even a few of the Nazi bad guys.Brown does a great job of not only telling a great story, but infusing it with just the right amount of detail to give you a great picture of the various scenes. His descriptions of the racing venues, living quarters, even the weather, set the scene without belaboring the point.In addition to the expected history lesson of the 1936 Olympic in Berlin and some of the surrounding controversy and politics, I was fascinated by the history of the sport of rowing, and learned a great deal of fascinating information. I did not know the the sport of rowing was a hugely popular spectator sport, often drawing crowds as large as 100,000 people! I gained a huge appreciation for the sport, the dedication and sacrifice required of its participants, and the craftsmanship that goes into the building of the boats themselves.All of that would have warranted a good review. But the way all the history, personalities, political landscape, and lifelong dreams come together in the final race for gold at the end of the book is nothing short of riveting. I was glued to my seat reading the description of that climactic race; just as good as any thriller.Finally, I loved the pictures that were peppered throughout the book, as well as the epilogue, which recounts the remainder of the life of each participant.Great book.---------------I noticed Amazon and Goodreads have a slightly different meanings to their 5-point scale. I thought it was odd to have a different rating for the same book on two different sites, so I came up with my own scale below. For the record, it is fairly close to Amazon's scale, but allows me to be consistent between both sites.5 - Fantastic. Life-altering. Maybe only 25 in a lifetime.4 - Very good.3 - Worth your time.2 - Not very good.1 - Atrocious4Storytelling at its Best.I have never rowed. I have never read a rowing book that I can remember. If all stories about rowing were written like Daniel Brown's fabulous multi-level biography, I would read every one of them. This is a wonderful account, told with such detail and precision that I sometimes felt as if I were in this tale. Mr. Brown totally sucked me into his adventure. These young men who rowed for the USA in the 1936 Olympics faced huge obstacles. It was the Depression. Many were dirt-poor. They came from a small (then) and nondescript town of Seattle. They could not have had more difficult problems thrown their way. But by taking every sliver of hope, and mixing in superb craftsmanship (from George Pocock), excellent coaching (Al Ulbrickson), and these nine perfectly attuned young men learning together........the result was perfection. This is a true Team sport. I learned that. It is nice to learn something you never knew, but is common knowledge to an entire set of other people. If you want to read a great, true story of success, this will fit the bill in spades.....and you will understand rowing to boot.The research is mostly based on primary resources, including interviews with some members who were still living as the book was pulled together. Family members did supply additional information to make this undertaking feel solid and well thought out.Concepts from Daniel Brown to consider that are mixed into the story to teach all of us: 1) One of the fundamental challenges in rowing is that when any one member of a crew goes into a slump the entire crew goes with him. 2) There are certain laws of physics by which all crew coaches live and die. The speed of a racing shell is determined primarily by two factors: the power produced by the combined strokes of the oars, and the stroke rate, the number of strokes the crew takes each minute. 3) To defeat an adversary who was your equal, maybe even your superior, it wasn't necessarily enough just to give your all from start to finish. You had to master your opponent mentally. When the critical moment in a close race was upon you, you had to know something he did not- that down in your core you still had something in reserve, something you had not yet shown. 4) The things that held them together--trust in one another, mutual respect, humility, fair play, watching out for one another--those were also part of what America meant to all of them. There are other great ideas to ponder in this epic almost 400 page, could-not-put-down story. I am not giving away anything by telling you that they DO win Gold at the 1936 Olympics. It is HOW they did it that is so darn exciting. Even knowing the end result does not diminish this bigger than life adventure. This is a must read, period.5You'll miss out if you skip this bookI live in the PNW and for quite some time would pass the UW Shell House on my way to and fro. It sits on the edge of Lake Washington by a road that connects to some walking trails along the lake. Until recently, I've never lived more than 5 miles from it. I never had a clue of the backstory of the building and always kind of associated it with the days that Montlake Bridge would be closed for rowing competitions and boat season opening days. More annoying than anything else.This book totally turned that around and I gained a new understanding and respect for the sport and the UW teams. The book captures both the excitement of success but more than that, it tells the tale of the personal & physical struggles necessary to build an Olympic Gold Medal Team in an engaging and compelling way.We always talk about teamwork in our society. We say things like one star does not make a team when, in fact, s/he sometimes does carry a team to victory. That's not possible to do in crew. An award winning crew truly understands the need for everyone to participate at the top of their game, to keep the egos in check, the body in shape, and the goal forefront in their minds and actions. They cannot win otherwise. This is the story of how the UW Men's Crew overcame Ivy League bias and financial, political, and physical challenges to become that team.It's a quick read, well written and informative. Others will give you details. I encourage you to give it a shot even if you have no interest in the sport or the location. A really good, real life, come from behind, underdog story5Sonny, back in the day did it much differentFantastic book about a very fascinating topic. Not only it is a look into what people were going through during the Depression, it shows the different way that training was viewed back in that day. My current position has me working with a number of college athletes, so I recognize the amount of time and effort today's athletes put into their training and playing on top of the academic requirements placed on them. Back in the day, it was at a whole different level. These coaches were all about working and then working harder and doing it again. There are a number training regiments which have come down through the decades, but a coach that kept his rowers out on the water in the middle of a driving sleet storm would probably get in trouble now days. This is on top of spending summers hanging on the side of a cliff to work at dam building. Again, these guys are just at a whole different level. Great read, great topic.5Fast and as decribedJust as described and quick...thanks5Thoroughly enjoyed it after a bit of a slow startEach year, our high school assigns a book that all students are required to read over the summer and then they have an assignment related to the book upon returning to school. This was the book chosen last year and I heard good things about it from my daughter and nieces and nephews so I thought I would give it a go.I must say that it started out a bit slowly as a lot of the foundation was being laid and it didn't pull me in immediately like some books do but I stuck with it and I was glad that I did. By the time I was about a third of the way through, I was totally sucked in. It is a book that really has something for everyone -- compelling history (Nazi Germany, 1936 Olympics, the Depression era), athletic training and competition (who knew that the sport of rowing could be so fascinating), and compelling stories of individuals that overcame insurmountable odds. I was truly disappointed to see this book end.5An Important Book For All SeasonsWith no reservations, this is the best book that I have read in the past two years. Everyone I've given a copy to has loved it also. Although men and boys might enjoy the book a shade more, the women and girls I know that have read it, give it 5 + stars, too. A story of courage, perseverance, hard (even grueling) work, faith and trust, teamwork, 'true grit,' and, yes, love -- it will inspire you, it will "lift you up in all your leaning places." I doubt if you can begin the book without finishing it, and, furthermore, for awhile after finishing it, all other books will seem dull and unimportant, and hard to get into. If I were in a position of leadership -- a Lt. leading a platoon, a Scoutmaster, a teacher, an executive officer of any company -- large or small, a pastor, or youth leader -- I would make The Boys in the Boat required reading for all of those I might be charged with 'leading.' It is said that when you read a good book, you should be 'a different person' when you put it down. Daniel Brown's book falls into the category of being "life changing." The life of the main, REAL 'character' plus the excitement and tension related to the boat races will keep you riveted to the book, the first time through. The second reading yields insights and truths that are likely missed during the first reading. This book is a "keeper,' and one to 'pass down the line' in families. Thank you, Daniel James Brown, for a real treasure.5
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