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  • The Death Cure (Maze Runner, Book Three)
  • The Death Cure (Maze Runner, Book Three)
  • The Death Cure (Maze Runner, Book Three)

James Dashner

The Death Cure (Maze Runner, Book Three)

James Dashner

The Death Cure (Maze Runner, Book Three)

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  • Delacorte Press
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So I was a little disappointed with the ending of this trilogySo I was a little disappointed with the ending of this trilogy. Again, like I felt in the first two books, I think Dashner had a great concept and just fell a little flat. His writing skills are lacking and I feel like that has a lot to do with his inability to really get the point across that he is aiming for.With that said, I still thoroughly enjoyed the book. He does a good job answering many open-ended questions left throughout the series. But l, again, the character development was awful.*SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS*Newts death didn't affect me and I thought the whole thing was dumb. He told Thomas not to open it until the right time without telling Thomas when that was then got mad at him for not doing as the note said but how was Thomas supposed to know he was supposed to read the note. On top of that, why would you ask something like that of a friend and not just do it yourself? I was expecting the note to be something more along the lines of "Hey, I killed myself and it's okay, I didn't want to slowly go crazy and I didn't want you to open it until after so you wouldn't try to stop me". Would've been much more believable and impactful.I was disappointed with the whole "new twist on zombie apocalypse" feel. I really enjoyed the concept presented in the 2nd book of everybody going slowly insane. He should've stuck with people going completely mad and less "I'm hungry for human flesh" zombie thing. I'm pretty over the zombie apocalypse.I was never really connected to any of the characters, never really liked any of them. The closest I ever got was Minho in the first book. Dashner brought him in as a good sassy, light-hearted type character that could have been an amazing character with a more talented writer to really build him up better. However, by the end of this book I hated Minho. Is character development was horrendous. He just became a wreckless character that wanted to hit things. He lost all of his charm and just became annoying and a nuisance.Thomas's attitude is unbelievable. He ditched Teresa for something he knew WICKED made her do to save him but then when he figured out Brenda had been working for WICKED all along he didn't bat an eye, what? I was waiting the whole time for Brenda to turn on him. But I did enjoy that to an extent. He did leave you wondering until the end who was really on Thomas's side and who wasn't. Dashner did a good job of making the reading equally suspicious and mistrustful as Thomas. Definitely a high point in the series.I also really enjoyed how he ended the book without clarifying who were really the "good guys" and who were really the "bad guys". I loved that actually. He didn't fall into this overdone and cliche bad vs good. He kind of left you to decide who was good and who was bad. He brought in a grey area. Everybody wanted to help humanity but everybody just had a different way of doing so. And I feel like that's more realistic than anything I've read from other post Apocalyptic stories. That's what's happening now with our own politics. Like in the US we have liberals and conservatives. Whether you want to believe it or not, both sides want what's best for our county, they just have different views on how to achieve that and so they hate the other side for their differing approaches. That's the story Dashner is telling g here and I think it's genius. He didn't portray WICKED as this awful evil power. They were trying to do what they felt was best for humanity by finding this cure no matter what the costs but just failed. And the Right Arm wanted what was best for humanity in not losing our humanity by testing on children but they also just went about executing their rebellion wrong (in that they were ready to kill a bunch of kids on order to stop WICKED).The book didn't leave me totally crushed that I wouldn't get any more of Thomas and his friends story because, again, his character building was seriously lacking. But I was left feeling pretty satisfied. (Other than some unanswered questions and some points in the books that were left fairly questionable) He definitely could have ended it stronger but overall I'm not mad at it. Hopefully the prequels will answer some more of the questions and questionable inclusions throughout the series.3I thoroughly enjoyed the adventure Dashner takes us onHaving read the first two books in the Maze Runner series, I decided to venture into book three, The Death Cure by James Dashner. This book picks up right where book two left off, the main character Thomas being recaptured by the organization WICKED. They have chosen Thomas and his remaining friends to participate in the final stage of testing to fight a disease called The Flare . We are brought alongside Thomas on a journey out into a zombie-like apocalyptic world.I had a two-sided experience with reading this book. On one hand, I thoroughly enjoyed the adventure Dashner takes us on. I loved the picture he paints of how biological warfare could lead to the crumble of society as we know it. The fictional, yet realistic take on what the future of earth could hold thrilled me. The world Dashner describes resembles what we see around us today, only with an eerie twist. On the other hand, I felt that the dialogue was slow and a bit sticky. I would recommend devouring this book at a fast pace, enabling you to speed through the sometimes-stale dialogue and enjoy the plot. I would definitely recommend this book for young adult readers but perhaps not any higher reading level.4Sloppy, nonsensical writing. The Death Cure unraveled like a ball of yarn...This was, by far, the weakest book of the first three in the series (I have yet to read the fourth book). I didn't have the urge to read anymore halfway through, but pushed on just to see if it got any better. The author got very sloppy near the end...and did a downright terrible job of wrapping things up. I felt cheated and wanted my money back.-Spoilers--Brenda is an annoying character...because the way her relationship with Thomas develops is very forced. They do not have the connection he and Teresa had. He and Teresa belonged together for better or for worse--the author showed us this through how Thomas felt he was cheating on Teresa with Brenda...-Terwsa forgave Thomas for not waking up to find her when she called out to him during the dorm raid. Chuck had no real reason for being killed (when wicked couldve simulated his death as they did with the hanging bodies). Teresa did not deserve to die. Thonas couldve trusted her if hed bothered to regain his memory. He doesnt care enough when she is crushed....he leaves her to die alone and goes off to make out with Brenda...totally unbelievable. He trusts and forgives Brenda freely but never lets Teresa in. We never learn what Teresa got back from her memories...but we learn that it would not have altered Thomas to regain his. Yet he never does. Brenda gets everything she wants in the end but Teresa dies alone. Thomas becomes a complete and total narcissist...a coldblooded killer who is a disgrace to the sacrifices made for him.-Teresa and Thomas are important in the 1st book. The second book their relationship gets weird. Then in the last book Thomas is up Brenda's butt for nonreal reason. Teresa deserved to live at the end more than Thomas did.-2I'm disappointedThe first book is pretty good. The second is a bit awkward at times, but still good. Then this book comes and it feels like a first draft. I couldn't shake this sense that we're being rushed through the plot near the end of the story. Where things were explained, sometimes too much in earlier books, this one had things that could have been explained better.I'm disappointed because the idea of the series is still really good! It's just how it got carried out that kinda kills the thrill of it in the end.3Awful, Awful, AwfulOh the writing. It was so poor. My eyes just glazed over in most places to protect me from the stilted, unbelievable dialogue, and horribly contrived plot choices. One of the better characters died and I didn't even care, I'm sad to say.It's a shame because the ideas were there - the execution was not. In better hands I feel like this could have been a rather compelling series. It makes me wonder how it ever got past an editor in the first place. I felt like there were so many places that Dashner wrote himself into a corner and that we as readers were cheated when he chose coincidences as the easy way out.The ending was atrocious as well. A character was killed for convenience really and that was the only part of the book that upset me. Not that the character died, but that it was convenient for the character to do so. I was happy when it was over.Despite my neurotic tendencies to finish things I've started, I have decided not to read the prequel The Kill Order or the other prequel I heard was in the works.Hopefully the movies will be one of those rare, redeeming instances where they are better than the books.1A Disappointing Conclusion To A Mediocre TrilogyIf there had been more snarky Minho comments I may have enjoyed this book more, but alas, he was barely even mentioned throughout this disappointing conclusion to what started out as a promising trilogy. The Maze Runner had its flaws, yes, but I was engrossed in the story. I wanted to know what would happen to Newt and Minho and Chuck. I wanted to know how they'd escape the Maze. And most importantly, all I wanted to know was why!? As the series progressed, there was presumably a thousand whys I wanted to know, and I thought The Death Cure would answer at least half of them...I thought wrong. Very, very, very wrong.What was that one little thing Thomas was constantly itching for when he was first sent up to the Glade? Anyone remember? Naturally, he'd want his memories back after WICKED stole them from him and he got himself shredded to bits from a griever just for a little snippet of them. Right? It was killing him as he trekked across the Scorch that he couldn't discern the flashes of his memories, so it should be a no-brainer that Thomas would jump the first ship that can grant him his memories, right? Well now, WICKED is handing him his memories back on a silver platter. Thomas, since he's such an incredibly ingenious individual will of course accept this offer, right? Right? Well, surprise surprise! He doesn't.Let me just wrap my head around this. You, Thomas, have been yapping on and on and on about how you've been wanting your memories back, since the moment we met you, correct? Not only, are you given an opportunity to get your memories back, but also, to possibly save the human race, including (view spoiler). You don't think that there's even a remote chance that you alone could help WICKED find a cure and save thousands of lives? After everything that's happened, I understand that you don't trust WICKED, but honestly, what else do you think they're going to do to you? Do you not realize that if they really wanted you dead, you'd be that way already. I thought you were the one who stupidly ran into the Maze to save a guy you didn't even like. You may have been an idiot, but at least you were a selfless idiot.James Dashner, that was a very cheap way for you to keep Thomas in the dark. *glares furiously at laptop screen*What I find quite ironic, is that I never would have discovered that the entire trilogy revolved around a tremendous plot hole, if Dashner hadn't invented it himself. For those of you who don't know, James Dashner has another series called The Mortality Doctrine, which centralizes around the idea that human beings have become obsessed with the VirtNet - a virtual reality, similar to the Matrix. In the VirtNet, humans plug into the NerveBox (very creative names, indeed) which enables the user's brain to feel everything he/she experiences in the virtual reality...including pain. Sounds like a much simpler solution to an otherwise difficult problem, eh?If WICKED has the technology to create a FlatTrans, don't you think they'd be able to construct a virtual reality that can manipulate the subject's brain to perceive essential emotions and feelings? We're talking about the same organization that has a chip in Thomas' brain, so he can speak telepathically to Teresa. Clearly, they have the advancement in technology to construct a virtual reality and create seemingly real, stressful situations. It would also be a much more controlled and effective experiment.Variables. It's all about the variables. I still don't understand why finding a cure relies on variables. Why did the variables have to be so specific (i.e. Teresa making Thomas feel betrayed)? How does that affect the Munies' brains? Is whatever makes them immune encoded in their genetic makeup, or is it some kind antibody or combating pathogen that's only secreted in their brain? How does studying their behaviors to x and y variables help you find a cure?Deus ex machina. I say this phrase quite often, even when it doesn't entirely make sense in the context. It simply means an unexpected power or event saving a seemingly hopeless situation, especially as a contrived plot device in a play or novel. Very fitting for the ending of The Death Cure. (view spoiler)There you have if, folks! This poorly written, potential-filled story ends as a train wreck. I feel like The Maze Runner could've been spectacular if it was written better, ended on a more realistic conclusion, and didn't have a sorry excuse for a protagonist. I'll still watch the movies of course, because so far, they're better than the books. As we tried to instill in each of our subjects over and over, WICKED is good. 1How is it that so many of the "#1 best seller" books I read turn out to be such ...I'm starting to lose faith in humanity. How is it that so many of the "#1 best seller" books I read turn out to be such complete disappointments. I had heard a lot of great things about this book, with people comparing it to the Hunger Games, etc. Let me tell you, this is NO Hunger Games. The writing is no where near as good as in the Hunger Games, the character development is either non-existent or completely inconsistent, and the plot and explanation for why the kids are in the maze make absolutely no sense (I consume a lot of sci-fi/fiction, so I'm pretty much a pro at suspending disbelief. There's no amount of suspension of disbelief that would get you to buy any of the "explanations" this book gives you for why things are the way they are). Also, the characterizations of the female characters is horrible. So horrible, in fact, it made me wonder if the author had been going through a bad divorce when he was writing the series. Why does he hate women so much?Some of you may be wondering, if you hate it so much, why give it 2 stars? Well, first of all, the dude finished writing a trilogy, so A for effort. And, despite all its flaws, I can kind of see why others would like it. So, I'm giving it 2 stars. Though, I reserve the right to change my mind later.********************SPOILER ALERT*****************************I'll try and leave these spoilers as vague as possible in case someone does some accidental scrolling. BUT OH MY GAWD. Why are the characters soooo flippin' dumb when they're supposed to be some sort of geniuses?!?! I wanted to scream at some of the decisions that the main character made (and not in the fun scary movie "don't go down into the basement!" kind of way. At least in scary movies, you can just assume that the characters are not too bright or are too traumatized to make a good decision. In this book, you know that the kids are supposed to be geniuses who were groomed for this task. So what the heck?! Why the stupid decisions that make absolutely no sense?!?!?!).Also, the reason they were put through the maze... I don't even have words. I challenge anyone to try and convince me that it makes sense in any way. The science of it all is completely nonsensical, even if you give the author a lot of leeway. I think this author should just give up on writing any book that involves any sort of science. Unless it's just to report some basic fact like "the Earth is round."And, lastly, the female characters in the book. What. The. Heck. There are basically 3 main females. The first one, of course, is somehow romantically linked to the main character and vacillates from either being completely useless or ruining everything. The second one is supposed to be some great fighter or something, but what's one of the first things she does? She comes on to the main character and is all "come hither, you sexy beast." (well, not in those words exactly, but she might as well have said that). And the third female is that head scientist lady, who, seriously, has got to be the stupidest scientist ever. Actually, I don't even know if she was really a scientist. She was so dumb. No, I've decided she couldn't have been a real scientist. She was just a super manipulative person who ruined people's lives because of some less-than-flimsy theory. And the lesson you learn at the end of the series? No female can be trusted. They are duplicitous she-devils who are just out to manipulate every situation. I would've liked the book much better if they had just left out all the female characters.Oh! and one more obnoxious thing in the book. What was up with the character Jorge and his constant use of the words "muchacho" and "hermano?" It just seemed so awkwardly forced and very clich . If you're going to make a character be bilingual, don't fall back on stereotypes from 30 years ago.In summary... I don't recommend this book. Read it if you want. If you end up not liking it, don't say I didn't warn you. If you liked it, well, let's just take comfort in the fact that we will never have to be friends.23,5 stars. Good but I was hopig for betterThomas and his friends have had to go through a lot that kids their age, or anyone for that matter, should never have to experience, all because of WICKED. They have survived the Maze and the Scorch but only the strongest and luckiest ones are still standing.Now WICKED claims that the time of games is over, they want Tomas and the others to cooperate for the final stage of finding the cure.But can they put their fate in WICKED's hands, hands that have crushed so many of them?Would they have better chances on their own out in the real world even though the world is crumbling and falling apart?Now Thomas and his closest friends have to make that final decision about where they stand and what to do.I liked this book but I was hoping for something even better to finish the journey that this trilogy has been. There was a lot of action, excitement and emotions. But I felt like in this book I lost all the connection with most of the characters, the focus went on the action instead of character-development. The plot's direction was not solid enough for me and I would have liked clearer answers to some of the questions that awoke during the series. But overall this was an decent enough end to a good trilogy.4I didn't like this book except for the ending*WARNING: I DO NOT RECOMMEND YOU TO START READING THIS SERIES, HERE'S WHY:*This review will encounter the whole series, but the stars are for the actual book.Ok, here's the thing: I LOVED THE FIRST BOOK. It was such a mystery: Thomas wakes up in a terrible state in a black box, terrified and confused, experiencing how his memory has been wiped out; he has a lot of references, but the references leads up to nothing. Out of the box, he discover a young boys community within a giant maze. The goal: how to get out of there. I thought through the whole first book "how clever, how imaginative".The ending and the solution was a bit questionable (i would maybe have imagined another solution?), but still good, and after reading the ending, you're like "I HAVE TO READ THE SEQUELS".BUT it was such a disappointment when I discovered that the sequels did not live up to the first book's standards. It all got too much, too crazy. It felt like the author was running loose, forgetting about the cleverness, and just adding everything he could think of. I found myself not enjoying the books after a while, just reading it because I bought the whole series and felt obliged because of an excellent first book and because i wanted to know why all this happened. I think there should only have been one sequel and not two. I read the prequel last, and it was actually better than the second and third book, but not as good as the first, so I ended my reading of The Maze Runner series on a better note than I thought I would after reading the other prequels.The books will leave you with some haunting, sick and creepy scenes I would rather not think of, and a horror of what might actually happen if the world actually encountered a big catastrophe, what would happen to the humanity: will what's seen upon as human to day, disappear to the "survival of the fittest"? At last I was left with: "what on earth did I just read?"I can not figure out if I regret reading the series or not. Fortunately, the decision of reading these books are up to you; is it worth it or not?The series' score: 3/52The Characters without Their MazeI say this at the end, but I want to iterate it here, prior to spoilers: If you're considering this series my recommendation is to read the first book and stop.I have no problem with a series in the teen-dystopian genre borrowing from other stories or some of the other criticisms lobbied at the book by others. I can suspend belief when Thomas and Minho routinely take more stabs, punches, cuts, falls, and abuse than Bruce Willis in all the Diehard movies combined, only to recover hours later to run for miles and fight again. What this book fails to do is far more basic. Warning: there are spoilers in the following parts for this book and those in the series that precede it.First, as is a problem in all three books, the dialogue is absolutely awfully rendered in this novel. It is unbelievable, stiff, and terribly cliche in many, many instances. Even if it didn't seem like it was written by an online protagonist phrase generator, a reader can only be subjected to so many uses of "shuckface", "slinthead", and "good that" before they wear out. Also, apparently Dashner believed his readers can't tell that Jorge is supposed to be Hispanic, which is the only explanation for him ending every sentence he says with "muchachos". The conversations between characters feel mechanical and predictable, and would lack authenticity--except that the characters don't feel authentic to begin with, so it would be difficult to have authentic dialogue from inauthentic characters.Second, the characters--already predictable and flat--actually become more predictable and less dynamic in this story. Will Minho overreact angrily to something and punch a person multiple times in this book? How many times will he respond to Teresa with spiteful, sarcastic remarks? Will Thomas make irrational decisions for his "friends" (who, like the readers, he knows nothing about other than their stereotypical behavior)? How many times will Brenda act affectionate toward Thomas for an undetermined reason? Will Thomas's veins fill with hatred every time Rat Man speaks? There are dozens and dozens of questions like this that a reader can answer without ever picking up this book, because the characters were cast in their mold hundreds of pages ago and not only fail to evolve, but repeat their stereotypes multiple times (in some cases, dozens and dozens of times) in this book. The most dynamic character, and the only one who truly evolves, isn't even an active character in the story. It's the Chancellor. Aside from her deus ex machine moment when she saves Thomas from surgery (the how and why of that is skipped by expositioning a surgical blackout) she makes no appearances until the epilogue. In her memo she laments the failure of WICKED, while still acknowledging their noble, original goal. The fact that she evidences this duality of understanding, and her ability to also transition to an alternate plan--demonstrate a change in a character not present anywhere else. Thomas pays lip service to moral dilemmas, but never considers them for more than a paragraph or two. He's too busy being irrational and acting through the linear plot line he's been tracking since the beginning.Third, the exposition is very lazy. As an example, consider when Thomas is being told to plant the device in WICKED's headquarters. "Planting" a device is a pretty cliche thing to do, except in this case an advanced weapons expert has to instruct him on how to "plant" it; only we discover that planting it involves nothing more than pressing a button and putting it somewhere. Anywhere, it seems. So Thomas's instructions, which required an advanced engineer to explain, would have been no more than "press this button and put it anywhere in any of the buildings". This of course means that Thomas wasn't necessary to plant the device. Any one of the immunes could have pressed the button and put the device somewhere at any point. In fact, they apparently didn't need to put it anywhere specific. It didn't actually even need to be planted. It just needed to be there. Even "though that's going to be our hardest task" according to Vince. Apparently not. Thomas strolls in, leaves it in the bathroom, and voila: the world's strongest organization is overthrown by a couple hundred rebels. That's just one example, and there is no need to itemize them all at length.Mostly though, this story lacks the compelling elements of the first book. The poor dialogue and stereotypical, flat characters are still present as early as The Maze Runner, but we're distracted by a dynamic, unique environment in the maze. Dashner is able to deliver intrigue with an imaginative setting that he does a good job of creating. The maze itself, and the uncertainty about why it exists, stands as a sort of character unto itself. Once that evolving, interesting, and dynamic pseudo-character is gone we're left with little other than the flaws: below-average exposition, scant and repeating imagery, terrible dialogue, and characters who don't grow enough to sustain interest.I was glad to finish the book to know how it actually ended, though despite all WICKED's lies and tricks and the duration of the trials and variables, and the late-introduced characters and organizations there was almost no satisfaction in its conclusion--other than relief. I'd recommend reading the first book and stopping when the characters press the PUSH button. That's the high point of the entire trilogy, and the last moment when there truly is a compelling reason to wonder what is going to happen next.1
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