Hobbies & Crafts

Hobbies & Crafts

Video Games & Consoles

Video Games & Consoles

Musical Instruments

Musical Instruments

Load image into Gallery viewer, The Glassblower (The Glassblower Trilogy)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, The Glassblower (The Glassblower Trilogy)
Vendor
imusti

The Glassblower (The Glassblower Trilogy)

4.3
Regular price
£34.00
Sale price
£34.00
Regular price
£56.00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (£22.00)
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.

  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • Amazon Publishing

Shipping and Returns

  • We offer tracked shipping on all orders. Tracking information will be shared as soon as the order is dispatched.
  • Please check the delivery estimate before adding a product to the cart. This is displayed for every product on the website.
  • Available shipping methods and charges will be displayed at the time of checkout, depending on your exact location.
  • All customers are entitled to a return window of 14 days, starting from the date of delivery of the product(s).
  • Customers are advised to read our return policy for details of the return process, eligibility, refunds as well as cancellations or exchanges.
  • In case of any issues or concerns about Shipping or Returns, please contact us and we will be happy to help.

Customer Reviews

There Needs to be a Warning in the Description of this Book!WARNING: Going to contain a few spoilers.I originally wanted to give this book 4 stars. It read well and though I enjoyed the book enough to keep reading it, it was truly a labor to do so. It was so slow paced and I found myself having to re-read pages over and over again. I'm an avid reader so it was not a lack of comprehension I would just simply glaze over.Here is my real problem and it made me want to give the book one star but I thought I wouldn't be taken seriously if I did so, so two stars it was... I AM TIRED of reading books where it is only possible for the female characters to "rise from the ashes" if they are *raped* or *beaten* especially when if you took the rape out of the story, the character would have undergone the same development and the plot actually wouldn't have changed much. There was absolutely no warning that those themes would be in this story and you don't know who is reading your novels! You could potentially be triggering survivors and that is not well played on the editor/publishers end if you fail to put that in the description.I work in a bookstore and I have read Children's books that have better developed female characters who have to suffer through trials and tribulations who: NEWS FLASH! Don't have to be raped and beaten to tell a good story. I almost did not finish this book because of the multiple rapes, and the poor writing in a particular section that almost made it sound like the author wrote a rape scene of a baby. I'm not kidding. Serious editing should have been done to that certain part in the book,and at that point I was done. I literally through my Kindle away from me because the book made me angry. Adding rape scenes don't make a novel more entertaining and I'm so angry2Missed the mark, but mostly not awfulI read this book on someone's recommendation, and it wasn't at all what I expected. I was expecting a literary novel translated from German. Instead, it reminded of a Jackie Collins novel - not necessarily in it's focus, but in it's feel. Nothing wrong with that, but certainly not what I was looking for. I had a hard time caring about the characters - they seemed rather flat and charicaturish, rather than fully fleshed out. I found the ending abrupt and unfulfilling. There is nothing special about this novel, but, for the most part (except what I mention under the spolier/ trigger warning below) it's merely unexceptional. I was disappointed, as I was hoping for a novel with well-written, strong female characters and an interesting yet educational history of glassblowing. It didn't deliver.Spoiler/ trigger warning:The rape scene that is meant to be pivotal seemed unnecessary and unlikely. There was enough there that story and character could have been almost identical without resorting to that cliche as what she needed to overcome, and a beating alone would have fit better in so many ways.Although the writing makes it seem otherwise at the time, no one rapes or attempts to rape an infant.2Too tidy and formulaicWhile this was sometimes an enjoyable read, it was far too formulaic in places for my taste.**SPOILER ALERT**It definitely followed the classic path of fiction:1. introduce characters2. make characters experience conflict3. wrap up all conflict4. everyone gets a ridiculously happy endingThe conflict was all mashed together in the middle. Some horrific things happened to everyone all at once so much so that it was overkill. Even just spreading out the misery would have made it less of a hitting-me-over-the-head kind of journey. And everyone seems to get past their traumas with basically no lasting effects beyond some general disliking of men that only lasts for a few chapters.It ended way too tidily for me. All loose ends wrapped up so everyone could be happy even if they never seemed to be heading in that direction. The woman that never felt she would fall in love with the brother-like character that pursued her for years suddenly and out of nowhere falls in love with him over the span of a few pages...and he's still waiting around for her. The sister that left her husband so easily gets a new identity and leaves him for another man she thinks is perfect for her (just like the first one) and who loves her child with no reservations about the child's father or mother's flightiness. The youngest sister that gets into a traditionally male trade has absolutely no hiccups in the launching of her business, just more and more orders for her work.The one character pairing I was actually interested to see come together was Marie and Magnus. The author seemed to forget about all the allusions to them ending up together and you never hear about it again after they go into business together.This is a good sized book and I'm sad I spent so much time on it rather than something better. I won't be reading the rest of the series.2Interesting historical premise, adolescent romance novel executionThe story is set in Thueringen, where my mother comes from; I enjoyed the nostalgic descriptions of the countryside and the village and town, as well as the lifestyle of the day. The story arc itself is interesting enough that I did read the whole book, but I was left very dissatisfied. The plot has some jarringly unrealistic points (spoiler alert!). A climactic moment is when one of the female protagonists is brutally raped...but somehow after a few months just magically "gets over it" and is totally fine going back to the scene of the crime BY HERSELF, with no trepidations, flashbacks, etc....and those around her, fully aware of what has happened and who the perpetrator is, are okay with this??? The characters have such potential but never become more than two-dimensional. Characters pop on and off the scene for either unclear reasons or unbelievably convenient ones. Relationships lack depth and believability. The ending is silly and adolescent...really, we are supposed to believe that a village girl can masquerade successfully as a countess on a turn-of-the-century ocean liner?? I am not invested enough in either the story or the characters to read the further books.2Necessity is not only the mother of invention, but, also, of risk taking!The Steinman girls are forced to take drastic steps, in order to survive, following the sudden death of their father. Johanna becomes the assistant to a prominent businessman and lives in his house while doing so. Ruth leaves a battering husband and takes her daughter with her, at a time when women were expected to endure such treatment. Artistically gifted Marie teaches herself the men only craft of glassblowing. Eventually, she creates decorated globes for Christmas trees.Ruth now travels to Sonneberg. She's desperate to meet American entrepeneur, F. Woolworth, of five and dime fame. He can be the sisters' lifesaver if he should place an order for the ornaments. After Ruth is shooed from the lobby of Woolworth's hotel, she manages to strike a bargain with a hotel maid to let her into W.'s room. He finds her there with the sample globes spread out on a table for him to admire. Admire he does. He places a 6,000 piece order which will keep the sisters up late at night blowing, decorating, and packing the fragile items for shipment.The rest you will have to read for yourself. The characters are believable and both good and bad ones fill the pages. While the story is rather far-fetched and a bit too long, I enjoyed it 3 1/2 stars worth. If rape is a trigger for you, be aware that this story does include one.3Had the Potential to be Good, But In this historical fiction novel set in 1890, three German sisters try their hand at making it on their own after their father, a glassblower, suddenly passes away. The father, while alive, was suspicious of a newfangled contraption the train! I thought that was odd, since by my calculations, the father was born around 1840, trains were already in Germany, he would have grown up with trains already a known machine to him, so how newfangled could they be to him? I didn t get that.Continuing with this story, life is hard for these parentless Fr uleins. The kindness of some of the neighbors, such as food gifts for the sisters, don t quite measure up to the sisters high hatted expectations. There s talk among the three about who they want to marry in the village, and when. The sisters are very unlikeable.The paragraphs telling about painting the designs on glass are colorful and nicely descriptive. I liked that.However, alas and alack! halfway through Chapter 14 (19%) the author started adding gratuitous soft porn and sexual violence to an otherwise potentially good story, and I tossed this book into the not-for-me pile.I believe I got this book as a promotion from the publisher about four years ago in return for an honest review. Turns out this type of book wasn t for me because of the porn and sexual violence. There. I said it.Sad to say, this book is another less than three stars rating. What a streak so far in this reading year. I hope this bad streak ends soon. It d be nice if authors would let potential reads know there s porn, violence, sexual violence, and the like in their books.2Descriptions of the new and innovative artwork leading up to production of the Christmas ornaments.n the village Lauscha in Germany, the three Steinmann sisters, Johanna, Ruth and Marie, have grown up learning the glassblower business of the time. When their father dies, they have to learn a new approach to carrying on their father s work. They step away from the traditional way where women did the packing, while the men did the actual blowing of the glass and step into a man s world where they each learn to blow, pack and market the products.I really enjoyed learning about the origin of glassblowing and the way the Steinmann sisters move into the production of Christmas tree ornaments for export to America. The description of the characters was close and vivid. I felt for them in their struggles to continue their business in a man s world while still in shock after their father s death. I also really, really enjoyed the descriptions of the new and innovative artwork leading up to production of the new Christmas ornaments. I felt this book was captivating and I made sure to get each new release in The Glassblower Saga as it was published.I highly recommend this work to readers of historical fiction and fans of Petra Durst-Benning s other works.(All opinions in this review are my own)4Excellent bookThis is an excellent story about a glassblower s three daughters and how they manage to survive after they wake up one morning to discover their father has died during the night.Johanna, the oldest, has the makings of a good businesswoman. Ruth, the middle daughter, is primarily concerned that she might never get married. And Marie, the youngest, is an artist born. They have been working in their father s business, finishing, packing, and writing labels for the apothecary jars and test tubes he specialized in. Now they don t know where to turn.An invitation comes from one of the town s other glassblowers, a man with a large shop where his three sons work from morning to night blowing various fancy glass items. The work is interesting, and Marie is especially excited that she gets to paint designs on the glass goblets and vases. But the situation isn t ideal for many reasons. For one thing, their new boss barely pays the three of them together enough to make ends meet. And when Johanna makes some suggestions on how the shop could be run more efficiently, he gets mad and fires her. She takes a job with the man who used to be their father s wholesaler in a larger town.And so, each of the sisters works toward doing what she thinks she wants to do. And they have some success at first.But there are obstacles along the way, and each of them finds that they can still do better yet. And Marie goes from painting flowers on glass vases to becoming the first female glassblower in Lauscha.5DisappointedNon-spoiler review:I picked this book because I wanted an immersive read, where I could get lost in another time. That didn't happen at all. I don't know if it was the writing or the translation, but I wasn't expecting 1890s Germany to be narrated with phrases like "Ruth flopped down on the bench" or "she knew she would spill the beans." I also didn't love the format of narration in terms of what the reader got to observe. There would be a major event, and then the chapter would just end. No perspective from the characters, and reactions would come in the next chapter as they reflected after the fact...maybe. Romances were pretty poorly developed because of this, and I just wasn't that interested. There are also a number of Plot Robots (side characters that have no function or personality other than forwarding the plot of the main characters), which was annoying to deal with as well. I didn't like any characters enough to enjoy their POV chapters.Some-spoilers review:The Amazon description of the book said that once the girls' father dies, they learn to survive on their own with Marie making the glass, Ruth keeping the house, and Johanna selling it for them. I looked forward to a feminist stand in tough times. Not only is this not how the book goes, Marie doesn't figure out how to blow glass until halfway through the book, they don't come up with an idea to support themselves until 2/3 of the way through, and it doesn't become a reality until 3/4 of the way through. The early book contains not one but two rape scenes, one from an abusive husband and one from a surprise S&M character. Not what I was looking for.22 Stars for Beautiful Glassblowing, 0 for the Undeveloped Characters and Uninspired Dramatic DevicesI was very excited to read this book due to all the raving 5 star reviews. The book started pretty slow and it kept that pace throughout. I really enjoyed everything this book was setting up to be. Joanna was going off on her own and making good money, Ruth was completely non-empathizable as the woman who was so desperate to find a rich husband that she would stay with someone that everyone unanimously agrees is a cruddy excuse for a boyfriend and SURPRISE! turns out to be an even cruddier excuse of a husband. And Marie is so secondary as a character I forgot she was in the book for a while. I loved reading about the glassblowing and the baubles and for that I give the book 2 stars, but the character development just came off so shoddily done and uninspired.For a book about strong female characters, none of the characters really came off as strong at all. Let's start with Joanna. Joanna is smart, strong, and capable. She also appears to have no interest in men. Seriously, she makes it pretty clear she doesn't like men at all, she never even thinks of them in a romantic or sexual way. The non-interest in men was so strong I was hoping that the author was writing in a lesbian or even asexual character. I thought, that would be a nice twist. Nope. Of course the smart, strong, independent woman had to have some turmoil and what is every uninspired writer's favorite way to de-power a strong female character? Rape her! The author could have just let her get fired and the same effects would have taken hold, but that wasn't gratuitous enough, let's depict a violent, really unnecessary rape scene that does nothing to further the plot. Then let's have Joanna, the strong woman, sit around for months grieving about it. Then let's add in Peter, the guy who has been pining over Joanna since the beginning of the book despite the fact that Joanna has made it clear that she has NO INTEREST in him. Not sexually. Not romantically. Not as anything other than a platonic friend. Of course all of this gets thrown out the window in the last section of the book where Joanna is suddenly open to being with Peter. Was I supposed to go "Aww, true love!"? Because I really just went "Huh?"Then there's Ruth. From the beginning Ruth was just annoying to me. She kept talking about how important it was for them to marry and she threw herself into finding a rich husband. She finds a man and he's absolute crap to her. But hey, he's rich. She marries him, he beats her. This guy who never suggested being physically violent before suddenly starts beating her. Emotional violence would have been just as powerful, but it's not as saucy as a good beating husband. Oh and don't get me started on the "as soon as he laid his hands on my baby I was done!" bull crap. So here's this woman stuck in an abusive relationship where she can't even leave for her safety, but I'm supposed to believe what really does it is seeing him go for the baby? What does that say for women in real abusive relationships who don't leave even after the husband beats the kids? Are they just not strong enough? Whatever. After Ruth left I thought, okay now it's time to develop independently as a character. But of course as soon as she starts getting strong, falls right into the arms of another man. But, this time he's a prince! So Ruth stays true to her unchanged and undeveloped submissive feminineness and leaves her entire family for this man she just met.Lastly, there's Marie. What can I say about Marie? Honestly not much. She wasn't very memorable. Her thing was being the shy artist. Honestly Marie was so undeveloped as a character she could really be anything. In some points in the book she was aggressive in a way that I guess was supposed to be standing up for herself? In some points in the book she might have been giving off romantic interest? Really just felt like Marie was completely tossed out.2
The Glassblower (The Glassblower Trilogy)

The Glassblower (The Glassblower Trilogy)

4.3
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
£34.00
Sale price
£34.00
Regular price
£56.00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (£22.00)