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  • The Handmaid's Tale
  • The Handmaid's Tale
  • The Handmaid's Tale
  • The Handmaid's Tale

Atwood, Margaret Eleanor

The Handmaid's Tale

Atwood, Margaret Eleanor

The Handmaid's Tale

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Customer Reviews

Mundane.I know this book is super popular, but obviously I missed the point. I rarely hate a book, but this one I just didn t like. I had very high expectations I suppose. I felt that the main character was bland, her relationships were dull and I just never developed a feel for her or her thoughts and actions about her position. Maybe that is where I missed the point.1Didnt enjoyNot my cup of tea1A big meh from me** SPOILERS **The surprising part, despite it's lack of quotation marks and zero structure, I read this quite fast. I'm incredibly surprised this was written by a woman. I get she wanted to make this a creepy tale of what if and get all gritty and scary with this patriarchy having taken over, but why write this and go through this entire thing to not have the women rise up? Why not show the resistance, why not have them at least hint at the end that there was hope of them gaining freedom again? Why write this at all without an ending. Anyone who has read any of my other reviews or knows me at all knows that what I hate more than anything in any work of literature is no ending. To leave an open ended book is to say you want the reader to do your work for you. It's a cop out to me. Why invest so much , build this whole story up and then not finish it? Drives me insane. Also I'm sorry but the quickness in which the terrorist attack and the new reign took over is a bit hard to swallow. Seems the author enjoyed trying to write the most cruel and unusual scenes in order to shock and terrify the reader instead of focusing more on the true story at hand. Just a big meh from me.1Hope the series is good, the book stinksThis book is not very well written and it's boring. Other than the women being treated as breeding cows for entitled men in this futuristic novel, I didn't get the message.1Brilliant!I adored this book. I love a dystopian story and this is one with brains. If you like 1984 and Brave New World this is for you. Because it's from a woman's perspective it consequently comes across as 'feminist' but my partner read it too and he really enjoyed it. It'll join the handful of other books I consider masterpieces like East of Eden, and To Kill A Mockingbird which I plan to read again. Very much looking forward to reading more of Atwood's work, and seeing the TV series.5Not a fan.I like books that seem realistic. This one wasn't a book like that. Had a hard time believing a country could change that much in a period of a few years.1A Stark, Important and Thought-Provoking TaleNolite to bastardes carborundorumI ve just added this title to my list of extra special books, but somehow that label doesn t fit right for The Handmaid s Tale. Don t get me wrong. It is without a doubt a fabulous work of fiction, superbly written, and with an unforgettable storyline. But extra-special to me indicates something wonderful, pleasant. And nothing about this book can be described as pleasant. The words stark, horrific, prophetic, terrifying and too-close-for-comfort spring to mind.I read this book before. I think it may have been fifteen years ago. The story, for the most part, stuck with me. But, I have to admit that it could almost have been two different books they certainly were two very different reading experiences. All those years ago I read a fascinating piece of speculative, dystopian fiction. Even then it felt all too plausible, but not in an immediate way.Re-reading the book now, given the political climate we now find ourselves living with, the story feels less speculative, almost less fictional. It doesn t take a huge stretch of the imagination anymore to visualize a scenario as we encounter in this book, unfolding around us in real time. Ordinary is what you are used to. This may not seem ordinary to you now, but after a time it will. It will become ordinary. There is so much in this book to scare a person witless. You read this book and you can imagine how it might happen, and worse, how it might swallow you up too. There s an insidious quality to this story, making the outrageous borderline logical, acceptable even. I found myself reading certain sections several times, knowing that what I d read was wrong, but having a hard time pinpointing exactly why or where. I m not sure whether I m impressed or horrified that this book made me understand how people get drawn in to, and learn to live with, a situation that s against their personal best interest. We lived, as usual, by ignoring. Ignoring isn t the same as ignorance, you have to work at it. Nothing changes instantaneously. But, think about it. In a time when humanity is threatened because fertility is down, doesn t it make sense to mobalize those women who are still able to give birth? Just as countries have for centuries mobilized men (and more recently women) in times of war? Already we were losing the taste for freedom, already we were finding these walls secure. And that s of course another worrying truth. While people may say they value their freedom, far too many seem to find comfort in being told what to do, think, and say. Humanity is supposed to stand out among mammals because of our capacity for independent thought, but all too often and all too many of us prefer to live without thinking too hard, happy to follow orders without contemplating the consequences for ourselves and for others.There was so very much in this story that horrified me and made me angry. But there was only one section that truly broke my heart: when Offred apologies, near the end of the book. Apologizes for acting on the need to connect with another.While I m sad that the story doesn t reveal what really happened to Offred, or even whether the end of her story is positive or negative, I do appreciate it was the perfect way to conclude the tale. An answer to the what happened next question, regardless of what that answer would have been, would have robbed this story of much of its power. It is because the story ends the way it does that I found myself going over what I d read and what I hoped/feared/imagined followed Offred s tale.This is, without a doubt, one of the best books I ve ever read. It is also among those stories that stay with me forever, because it is too unique, too shocking, and/or too thought-provoking to ever fade.5Right now Offred s story feels less like dystopian satire than a dire warning and a rallying call.Written in 1985, I should ve read this book ages ago. But, considering our current fraught and frightening political climate, now is actually a profoundly fitting time to delve into one of the most upsetting yet eerily plausible dystopian stories I ve read yet. The Handmaid s Tale is set in a not-so-futuristic United States in which the government has been overthrown by an extreme Christian movement that establishes a totalitarian theocracy under which human rights become severely limited and extreme class divisions are created. Women are stripped of all their rights (they aren t even allowed to read) and, for the class known as handmaids , even their personhood is lost. These women are breeding stock, valued only insofar as their ovaries are viable, kept for reproductive purposes in order to aid the ruling class during a period of sharply declining births. Our titular Handmaid is a woman named Offred, who remembers what the world was like before as she endures what it has become. Hers is a tale of survival, resilience, and resistance. Right now Offred s story feels less like dystopian satire than a dire warning and a rallying call. Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.5Its just plainly a bad story, if you can even call it a storyIts just a jumble of bizarre thoughts by an author whose delusional. I quit at chapter 15. What a waste of time.1Are there any questions?Perfect last line to this book as I was left with so many questions at the end...the first of which was simply, "Huh?".This book confused me. Given all of the hype around it, I was expecting much more from this book. It was decent and I can completely understand how it would translate well into a mini-series or movie...but I just couldn't get my head around how/why things changed so quickly in society...over night, all women's rights were taken away but there seemed to be little information as to who or why. I was further confused by tourists coming into Gilead...why were there fully functioning societies outside of Gilead that seem to have been unaffected by whatever caused this tremendous shift in US society. How could this have gone on for so long afterwards without a civil war of sorts breaking out. Without having more information of the total collapse of society and a little more longevity of what lead to the collapse, it was hard to buy into this tale.If I could buy into the collapse of society and the development of Gilead to save the human race, there just wasn't enough information on how the Handmaids, the Aunts, etc were chosen, why they took healthy children away from their birth families and assigned the mothers of those children to other households for procreation...none of it made much sense. Also, what happened to the women in the colonies, the "unbabies", etc.There was a great core to this story, just not enough detail to support any of it so I was very disappointed in the end.3
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