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  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

Random House

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

Random House

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

£66.00 £40.00 Save: (39.39%)
£40.00 £66 Save £26 (39.39%)
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Customer Reviews

... intentionally omits certain facts to make the story sound better and fit the proposed theoryThe author makes interesting points/theories but then tells a long-winded story (based on real life events) that intentionally omits certain facts to make the story sound better and fit the proposed theory. I have actually read similar stories that interpreted the facts to reach different points/theories. I felt like there were some credibility issues with this book. Also, I read/listened to the book because i was hoping i could learn some concrete tools that i could use to replace my bad habits with goods habits. I did not find those tools in this book.1Believe in yourselfUse the Power of Habit to make the changes that you've wanted to make but haven't gotten around to.I've learned to exercise regularly, wake up early, and make healthier food choices. My habits and systems have improved my wellness, and if it worked for me, then it can definitely work for you.I've also picked up a positive habit of reading at night before bed instead of mindlessly scrolling on my phone.5This is very important because we can learn from it how to replace a bad habit (smoking) with a good one (exercise)Duhigg explores what science has to teach us about how habits are formed, how they function, how they can be modified and how they influence our lives and our business world. The book is divided into three parts: The Habits of Individuals, The Habits of Successful Organizations, and the Habits of Societies.Based on studies of animal behavior and human behavior, we (that is rats, monkeys and humans) form habits the same way. There is a cue of some kind that triggers a habit, followed by some form of routine that has been completed memorized and operates more or less automatically, followed by some form of reward that reinforces the habit. Whether it is buckling our seat belt, brushing out teeth, smoking a cigarette or using heroin, this same habit loop operates in all of us.The brain creates habits because it simplifies our activities. If we had to consciously decide and think out everything we do every day throughout the day from scratch it would be overwhelming for the brain. Habits are little routines that automate aspects of our behavior. We are not usually conscious that the habit is being formed, and once it is in place we need not expend much thought to follow it. It is a very effective efficiency that our minds use to free us up to think about other things.Since we now know how a habit is formed and how they function we can modify existing habits and create new ones. We must identify the right cue which leads to the desired routine which is then followed by the reward. We must know in advance, or expect, the reward to motivate us to engage in the routine. The reward generates endorphins in the brain which are powerful motivators. They motivate us to repeat the routine every time the cue occurs. It is a bit more complex than that, but that is the gist of it.Duhigg goes on to explain in fascinating detail how studies have shown us how we can modify a habit and how to replace one habit with another. This is very important because we can learn from it how to replace a bad habit (smoking) with a good one (exercise).Certain habits also develop in organizations and in societies and they come together to create a culture, whether it is the culture of a corporation or the culture of a society. Culture, it seems, is primarily driven by key habits.What I found useful about this book:This book helps us understand how habits are formed and how we can use them to our benefit, change them when we need to and replace them when necessary. Duhigg does warn the reader that although we understand the way habits are made and altered it is not always easy to do it. Determining the actual cue for example can take some experimentation and work.Readability/Writing Quality:The book is very well written. It is engaging. It contains lots of references to studies and science but not in a dry or boring way. It is a series of fascinating stories. It is very well organized.Notes on Author:Charles Duhigg is an award winning investigative reporter for the New York Times.Other Books by This Author:Smarter, Faster, BetterRelated Website:[...]Three Great Ideas You Can Use:1. Habits all function in the same basic way: a cue begins a behavior routine which ends in a reward. Once we understand this we can understand how habits work and how to change them or use them.2. We are manipulated every day by business through habits. Marketing has become in many ways habit focused.3. Once we know how to form and change a habit we can gain more real control over our own behaviors; we can replace bad habits and create good ones.The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business5Not practicalIts a ok book, however I thought it would be much more practical.There are a lot of examples of companies tracking peoples buying habits and implementing new habits in the workplace. Wasn't a fan of some of the long drawn out stories that make a single point, most of them could be explained much more succinctly, sometimes it seems as though the writer is a frustrated story teller trapped writing a factual non fiction book.There are a couple of techniques in here that you can use in your day to day life,but its pretty lacking in that regard,I thought that would be the main focus of the book.It's primarily a vague overview of habit research, really not enough practical information that you can use in your own life, which is what I feel the the book has been marketed as.2lies some really great lessons and thought provoking ideasWithin the pages of The Power of Habit, lies some really great lessons and thought provoking ideas. The lessons can relate to just about any habit in life whether it is business, exercise, or life related. Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit, reveals what habits are really all about. The reader will be surprised about what all goes into a habit and the commitment and willpower it takes to recreate a new habit. He explains where habits come from and how they are wired into human brains. Duhigg s research is explained through various stories and experiments. His stories and experiments are anywhere from comedic and cute to really detailed and scientific. My favorite experiment would be when four-year-old children s willpower is tested. A child is left sitting in a room with a marshmallow in front of them tempting them to eat it. However, if the children wait ten minutes without consuming the marshmallow, they receive a second one to enjoy. How many four-year-old s have great willpower? How many eat the initial marshmallow? You ll have to read The Power of Habit to find out. I wouldn t say this book is a quick read or a page turner by any means but has some good intellectual and informational sections that will really make the reader think about his or herself. I would rate this book three stars.3Typical pop-psychology bloviating.I was looking for something more substantial, but this very much a run of the mill, formulaic pop-psychology book. Buying it is not necessary. Essentially the book says "when you are triggered to do a bad habit, recognize that trigger and do a good habit in its place." There; you just read the book.1Warning! Long form journalismThis book has good insights and analysis, told in folksy Lake Wobbegon style hidden deep in large piles of needlessly verbose expository stories.It's a 200 page book with maybe 10 pages of analysis, technique, and evidence.These let-me-totally-waste-your-time nightly news style yarns that spend time describing the wall paper and how the scientists dog was groomed is inadequate.You want stories? There's far better storytellers.You want useful information? There's far better methods and richer strategies.It's almost like the author was being paid by the word and maximized the volume for the biggest paycheck, like some highschooler desperately trying to stretch 1 paragraph of thought over 3 pages.2Boring and waste of moneyThis is really a bad book. I only managed to get through a very long and windy story of a marketing department for smelly Glade and how it became a success and when it started on an American football trainer with minute details of the game I fell asleep. Boring and not what I was hoping for. Bought it as the audiobook and the lector s voice is very grinding and annoying so it was a complete waste of effort and money. If I could mark it with no stars that would be it.1I Really Wanted to Like It...I really wanted to like this book...But what I wanted more than that were clear and concrete tactics or strategies to "hack" my habits...Strategies and tactics that were groundbreaking, clear, repeatable, and effectively "life changing"...Nope. Not so much.I grade content quality by number of under-linings, margin notes, and folded pages I've set at the end of the read...It scored extremely low in all of those categories. So it's not particular dense with usefulness.A few other things I didn't like...This book is 95% story, or anecdote. I'm not really into stories. I'd read a novel for a story. I read non-fiction to learn something useful- and prefer to do it quickly.The stories themselves are delivered non-sequentially...For example:story A beginningstory B beginningstory C beginningStory D beginningTo understand story A we need to story B. To understand story B we need story C. To understand story C we need story D.Then story A's middle or endingThen story B's middle or endingThen story C's middle or endingThen story D's middle or endingIt might be interesting to write this way, but it's an irritating read. Who wants their thought sequences disparate like this?This distracting structure could have been redeemed if there were meaningful conclusions or anything actionable amidst the mire.But there was not.Overall, is it worth reading? Yes...if you have nothing else very interesting to read.3A Janus-faced text, with very different halvesTwo halves coexist within this book s covers. One is outstanding; the other is a bit sloppy. Part one is the heart of the book; it explains what habits are about, where they come from, how they re hard-wired into our brains, and how they can be enormously powerful both to enslave us and to free us if we only we learn how to handle them well (the book s mission). I found this part of the book to be truly outstanding: well-researched, engagingly written and extremely persuasive. It combines scientific research, personal life-stories and journalistic interviews to great effect.While the 1st part is circumscribed to the individual level of analysis, on parts 2 and 3 the author takes the analysis from the micro to organizations (meso-level) and societies (macro-level). The author describes the power of weak ties of social networks, and claims that it helps understand the rise of social movements which it clearly does. But in his explanation, networks are rebranded as the habit of peer pressure . Networks as well as peer pressure, or culture can be powerful forces for change, undoubtedly. But networks are not habits as per his own definition. Different phenomena are conflated into the concept of habits, and in doing so the concept loses elegance and consistency.Intellectually, the book is revealing. On a personal level, it is incredibly useful and I m thankful to the author for writing it. I would have limited the book claims to the phenomena it can explain beyond any reasonable doubt. By taking the concept of habits beyond what it can solidly explain, parts 2 & 3 detract a bit of value and credibility from the book. Were it not for that, I would have given 5 stars to the book. In balance, this is still a great book that --with the caveat expressed-- I strongly recommend.4
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